NAMA Recovery of Tennessee | The Tennessee Statewide & Northwestern Georgia Chapter of NAMA-R

1.27.2016

NAMA Recovery of Tennessee Signs Letter to the TN General Assembly in Opposition to the Fetal Assault Law

Advocacy Organizations Oppose Fetal Assault Law


Image Courtesy of Artist, Jessi Wariner and Nashville Feminist Collective
Lawmakers should oppose Senate Bill 1629/House Bill 1660 and instead create effective, evidence based policies to support the health of women, their children and our communities
January 26, 2016

Dear Tennessee General Assembly, 
On behalf of the undersigned organizations and the hundreds of thousands of women and families we represent in Tennessee and throughout the country, we are writing in opposition to Tennessee’s fetal assault law (TCA 39-13-107) and the legislation that has been introduced to extend this dangerous policy.

1.24.2016

To Prison for Pregnancy: Let the TN Fetal Assault Law SUNSET in 2016!


 LET THE TENNESSEE FETAL ASSAULT LAW SUNSET IN 2016!!! 
Women need HEALTHCARE NOT HANDCUFFS.

Please take a few minutes to watch and share "To Prison for Pregnancy" by Brave New Films:

Two's Company, Three's Even Better: Why It's Important for Couples and Families to Enroll in Treatment Together

Two’s Company, Three’s Even Better:
Why It’s Important for Couples and Families to Enroll in Treatment Together

(originally written for and published in the 01/15/2016 of OTPG Quarterly, the quarterly newsletter of Opioid Treatment Providers of Georgia (OTPG), the Georgia state provider's association and chapter of the American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence, Inc.)

by Zac Talbott, CMA
Director, NAMARecovery of Tennessee

We know that addiction is a “biopsychosocial” disorder. That is, it has three very different parts or components that all must be addressed if a treatment approach is to give an individual the best shot at achieving recovery. It also means it’s a complicated disease that can be difficult to understand, as its manifestations do not directly correlate to a person’s “desire” or “motivation” to stop using illicit drugs. But one of these three areas, the “social” aspect of the disease, plays out in an individual’s environment and most especially a person’s home life.