NAMA Recovery of Tennessee | The Tennessee Statewide & Northwestern Georgia Chapter of NAMA-R

Friday, July 24, 2015

A Syringe Exchange Love Story with Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition

The importance of expanding access not only to methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatment but also to broader harm reduction services during this prescription pain killer and heroin addiction and overdose epidemic can not be overstated.

Monday, April 27, 2015

FacingAddiction.org is now open!

Visit facingaddiction.org to see the faces and read the stories of why people are going to DC for the Rally on the National Mall on 10.4.15! Add your story too. Sign up to volunteer. Be an ambassador for changing the way America looks at addiction. Help us shine a new light and change the conversation from problems to solutions.

We are joining with the Unite To Face Addiction Rally on October 4th in our nation's capital because we believe this is...
Posted by NAMA Recovery of Tennessee on Monday, April 27, 2015

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Petition in support of proposed Opioid Treatment Program(s) in Johnson City, Tennessee

Please take just a few seconds to sign and share this petition in support of the newly proposed opioid treatment program in Johnson City, Tennessee!!

Hopefully we'll have better luck this time around!


Please take a few minutes to sign this petition --- and share it! Lives are at stake.
Posted by NAMA Recovery of Tennessee on Saturday, April 11, 2015

Thursday, April 2, 2015

New Report from the Legal Action Center: 'Confronting an Epidemic: The Case for Eliminating Barriers to Medication Assisted Treatment of Heroin and Opioid Addiction'

DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THE REPORT HERE.

Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of accidental death in America, surpassing traffic fatalities at the beginning of this decade with more than 36,000 deaths annually.[1] Opioid pain relievers pose an increasingly dangerous threat to public health, leading to more deaths than those from all illegal drugs combined.[2] Meanwhile, heroin dependence and use more than doubled in just ten years, rising from an estimated 214,000 users in 2002 to 467,000 in 2012.[3]
Despite the devastating toll of this epidemic – both human and financial – a demonstrably effective medical response to the scourge of opioid addiction is tragically, and senselessly, underutilized: Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT). A broad range of barriers prevent Americans with substance use disorders (SUDs) from getting vital treatments they desperately need.